Carbon Emissions Monitoring

IBM has announced a Carbon Emissions Monitoring program and another interesting Carbon Monitoring site is http://carma.org/.  It would be interesting to hear what the folks at CARMA think about IBM's announcement.

IBM to count carbon emissions for cash

IBM has partnered with two other companies to build an application that they say can accurately measure corporate efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

The software, called GreenCert, is built on IBM's infrastructure software and tools from C-Lock Technology, which can accurately measure reductions in greenhouse gases including carbon dioxide. The companies are expected to detail the application on Wednesday.

Many companies are undergoing initiatives to reduce their carbon emissions, as part of corporate social responsibility or environmental programs.

Having a method to measure and certify those reductions is significant because it will allow those companies to sell those carbon offsets, according to IBM. The application is part of IBM's Big Green Innovations initiative to develop clean technologies.

And another interesting site is Carbon Monitoring for Action.

At its core, Carbon Monitoring for Action (CARMA) is a massive database containing information on the carbon emissions of over 50,000 power plants and 4,000 power companies worldwide. Power generation accounts for 40% of all carbon emissions in the United States and about one-quarter of global emissions. CARMA is the first global inventory of a major, emissions-producing sector of the economy.

CARMA is produced and financed by the Confronting Climate Change Initiative at the Center for Global Development, an independent and non-partisan think tank located in Washington, DC.

The objective of CARMA.org is to equip individuals with the information they need to forge a cleaner, low-carbon future. By providing complete information for both clean and dirty power producers, CARMA hopes to influence the opinions and decisions of consumers, investors, shareholders, managers, workers, activists, and policymakers. CARMA builds on experience with public information disclosure techniques that have proven successful in reducing traditional pollutants.

For several thousand power plants within the U.S., CARMA relies upon data reported to the Environmental Protection Agency by the plant operators themselves as required by the Clean Air Act. CARMA also includes many official emissions reports for plants in Canada, the European Union, and India. For non-reporting plants, CARMA estimates emissions using a statistical model that has been fitted to data for thousands of reporting plants in the U.S., Canada, the EU, and India. The model utilizes detailed data on plant-level engineering and fuel specifications. CARMA reports emissions for the year 2000, the current year, and the future (based on published plans).

Constructing a carbon emissions database of 50,000 power plants in every country on Earth takes a team effort. The methodology and data behind CARMA were developed over many months as part of the Confronting Climate Change Intiative at the Center for Global Development in Washington DC.

The primary architects of the CARMA database are David Wheeler and Kevin Ummel — with assistance provided by a dedicated team at the Center for Global Development. CARMA.org was created by the talented professionals at Forum One Communications, a web strategy and development firm that helps not-for-profit, foundation, government, and commercial organizations make an impact on important social issues.

CARMA Team Photo